Categorized | Religion

The trouble with Irshad Manji

Among critics of Islam, there few voices more prominent than the revisionist Irshad Manji.  Calling herself a “refuseniks,” Manji has been praised in the media, along other radical feminists such as Wafa Sultan and Ayaan Hirsi Ali, for their virulent denunciations of Islam and Muhammad.  Western pundits praise Manji for her “bravery,” and portray her as a courageous woman who is fighting fighting oppression and marching bravely forth toward the so-called democratic-atheistic values of the West.  Contributing her appeal is Manji’s persona herself: she is an ethnic minority in Canada and a radical lesbian feminist who voices solidarity with great liberal values of the secular and multicultural state, making her the ideal candidate to be the overaged poster-child of politically correct demagogues.

Irshad Manji’s claim to fame is her book The Trouble With Islam Today.  Her book has garnered her the admiration of the public, and made her a minor celebrity.  On the Left, she is admired as a lesbian atheist, and on the Right, by Zionists and others who find it useful to promote Islamophobia to further the cause of Jewish supremacism.  Through such coincidences, a number of Americans have been lead to believe that Manji is a sort of benign activist, working to foster peaceful reform within Islam and to assist with the dialogue between Islam and the West.  To that end, she created the “Moral Courage Project” at New York University, and made herself its director, stating that the mission of the project is to “develop leaders who will challenge political correctness, intellectual conformity and censorship.”

In actuality, Manji is not challenging anything.  She is hardly criticizing political correctness, since being a non-white woman and a lesbian to boot makes her nearly infallible to the radical leftist academic establishment of which she is a part.  Nor has she been censored by the West.  Quite the contrary, Manji regularly appeared in the mainstream media in Canada. She was newsreader and commentator on current affairs; she produced a public affairs feature on a multicultural faith television network (Vision TV); she debated issues on TV Ontario (the provinces version of PBS); she hosted a homosexual TV show on a popular local station called The Q-Files; she was a columnist for an Ottawa-based homosexual magazine called Capital Xtra!; she had a stint as national affairs editor with the newspaper Ottawa Citizen; she has appeared on the CBC (Canada’s national broadcaster); and MacLean’s (Canada’s copycat version of Time) named her as one of the ”100 Leaders of Tomorrow”. In America, the feminist Ms. magazine named her a ”Feminist for the 21st Century,” and she has appeared on CNN, PBS, C-SPAN, Headline News, Fox News Channel, the CBS Evening News.

A review of the “Irshad Manji phenomenon” appears in the Palestine Soldarity Review, and states that there are ways to interpret Manji’s apparent success: First, it can be viewed as as an extension of liberal multiculturalism; secondly, as an attempt to refine secular chauvinism; and finally, as an attempt  to falsify Islamic traditions.

Naturally, in the modern world, these things go hand in hand.  In the leftist worldview, it was white men who are to blame for society’s troubles.  In order to bring reform, the solution, to them, was to promote men and women of color to positions of power, in order that they could facilitate the deadly comedy of modernism.  Irshad Manji’s new-found fame is perhaps, then, not to be a surprise as we now have a queer woman of color who is now mixing morality and politics and attempting to undermine what globalists and modernists see as an oppressive system.

Manji wishes to use state power to make a space for secular, liberal-progressive politics, starting among Muslims in the West.  She hopes to construct the illusion that liberals like her have a monopoly on the self-criticism of the community.  However, in this totalitarian quest to impress liberalism and globalism among the Muslim world, the contradictions that rack society can only deepen.  For instance, Manji, like the majority of Western liberals, looks upon the French ban of the hijab as “progressive,” yet states that Muslim women must be free to choose their dress in Muslim nations.  Furthermore, like other liberals, her anti-racism is selective.  For instance, she berates the Palestinians for their supposed anti-semitism, yet is an open supporter of the extremist state of Israel.

The sociology that Irshad Manji presents is undoubtedly totalitarian at its core.  Her personal ideology exists not just to undermine Islamic societies, but also to undermine all traditional societies.  Namely, if one does not belong or does not possess an identity, if the search for these is unceasing, and if these two qualities can never be - as in becoming, not being, then it automatically follows that traits such as individuality and, more particularly, personhood, do not exist, and a gateway is opened for someone with enough power and clout to take advantage of a society that refuses absolutely to be identified or to belong.

Concluding Remarks: Irshad Manji is the result of the leftist ideology gone awry.  She is the product of a liberal, secular society in which identity is forbidden and where the Traditional must be stigmatized, and a mere dilettante pseudo-intellectual, who was given undeserved credit by the globalist establishment.  and extrudes her own compulsions onto everyone else in the civic arena.  But there is one area in which she does truly excel: as a clear example of bourgeoisie, ultra-leftist attitudes.  The American mathematician, social critic, and neo-Luddite Ted Kaczynski clearly illuminated such an attitude as ”feelings of inferiority” and “oversocialization,” stating that they were part and parcel of the modernist outlook on life.

Dawud al-Sini is a freelance engineer, writer, social commentator, historian, amateur musician, and political theorist originally hailing from Taipei, Taiwan. In the technical world, his wide variety of interests include computational nanofluidics, biomechanics, and green energy. In addition to his political writing, he has participated in and advised projects ranging from development of autonomous vehicles, to targeted drug delivery for cancer, to small-scale rural power generation.

3 Responses to “The trouble with Irshad Manji”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Linkage is Good for You: Vacations Are Also Good for You Edition says:

    [...] Dawud al-Sini - ”The Trouble with Irshad Manji” [...]

  2. Linkage is Good for You: Vacations Are Also Good for You Edition says:

    [...] Dawud al-Sini - ”The Trouble with Irshad Manji” [...]

  3. Irshad Manji? - Religious Education Forum says:

    [...] Manji? An article I found online: The trouble with Irshad Manji*|*Riding the Tiger [...]


Leave a Reply

    No Responses to “Mr. Obama of Amerikwa and Dr. Ahmadinejad of Iran”

    Trackbacks/Pingbacks

    1. Linkage is Good for You: Vacations Are Also Good for You Edition says:

      [...] Dawud al-Sini - ”The Trouble with Irshad Manji” [...]

    2. Linkage is Good for You: Vacations Are Also Good for You Edition says:

      [...] Dawud al-Sini - ”The Trouble with Irshad Manji” [...]

    3. Irshad Manji? - Religious Education Forum says:

      [...] Manji? An article I found online: The trouble with Irshad Manji*|*Riding the Tiger [...]


    Leave a Reply

  • Stay up to date

  • Subscribe to the RSS feed
  • Subscribe to the feed via email
  • Follow us on Twitter!

Find us on Facebook

Traditionalist Books


More books...